Tonsil and Adenoid Problems

TONSILLIAL INFLAMMATION (TONSILLITIS)

Tonsils are lymphoid tissues located on both sides of the oral cavity. The tonsils are one of the body’s first defenses. However, although they are the body’s defense organs, the tonsils themselves can become inflamed from time to time. Tonsillitis is a common condition especially in childhood. The disease often has a rapid onset. There is fever, sweating and chills along with a severe sore throat. Patients have difficulty swallowing due to sore throat. Sometimes there are painful swellings in the lymph nodes in the neck. Depending on the severity of the disease, general weakness and muscle aches can also be observed.

Viruses are the most common cause of tonsillitis. However, in 30% of patients, bacteria are the causative agents. When bacteria are the cause of tonsillitis, the most common cause is group A beta-hemolytic streptococci.

 

The diagnosis of the disease is made by clinical examination and throat culture when necessary. In blood tests, there is an increase in the number of white blood cells. Tonsillitis is an infection that usually clears up on its own. However, it can occasionally lead to peritonsilar abscess, infection of the deep boot and septicemia. When the causative beta hemolytic streptococci are left untreated, it can cause acute rheumatic fever and glomerulonephritis.

Treatment of tonsillitis is removal of the causative agent and supportive treatment. In patients who are thought to be beta-hemolytic streptococcus, a 10-day antibiotic treatment is required. In addition to antibiotics, antipyretic should be given to reduce the patient’s fever and fever, and the patient should be provided with plenty of fluids. Relief is usually observed within 3 days of starting treatment.

WHEN IS TONSICLE SURGERY DONE?

In recurrent tonsillitis, tonsil surgery may be on the agenda. The accepted criteria for this are:

Infections of the tonsils

7 times a year

5 times a year for 2 years

3 times a year for 3 years

Peritonsillar abscess (?2)

Tonsil/adenoid size causing shortness of breath, snoring, sleep apnea

Accumulation of infected debris in the tonsils that does not improve with medical treatment and causes bad breath.

WHAT SHOULD BE DONE WITH PEOPLE WITH BETA CARRIERS?

People who are beta carriers do not need to be treated as standard. Because in these, disease or beta-related complications are not usually observed. However, carriers need to be treated in the following cases:

Presence of recurrent beta infections in family members

History of acute rheumatic fever or glomerulonephritis

Close contact with people with streptococcal infections

Professional healthcare providers or hospitalized patients

Increased risk of acute rheumatic fever or glomerulonephritis in the community

ANAL MEAT PROBLEMS

The adenoid is the lymphoid tissue in the nasal cavity at the back of the nasal cavity. They can grow physiologically or due to infections and allergies, usually in childhood. Adenoid enlargement is more common in children aged 2-6 years.

 

WHAT ARE THE FINDINGS OF DENTAL MEAT?

When adenoid enlargement, nasal congestion, snoring at night, sleeping with mouth open, bad breath, recurrent upper respiratory tract infections are seen in children. The sleep quality of these children deteriorates. At night, sleep apnea, i.e. cessation of breathing during sleep, can be seen. There is a slowdown in the growth of these children. As the adenoid grows, it becomes a reservoir for bacteria and viruses and causes upper respiratory tract infections to occur more frequently. As children become infected, the adenoids grow larger. This creates a vicious circle. Eustachian tube functions may be affected in these children. This causes fluid collection in the middle ear and hearing loss. These children also experience restlessness and attention deficit during the day.

HOW IS GENIZE MEAT EXAMINATION PERFORMED?

It is not possible to see the adenoid by looking directly from the nose or mouth. The most ideal method to detect the presence of adenoid is to examine it with a bendable telescope called a flexible nasopharyngoscope. In this way, the adenoid can be seen directly and the diagnosis is made. X-ray films taken at soft tissue density can also provide information about adenoids, but they are often misleading. Another method is the examination, which we call finger-touch, by inserting a finger from the mouth of the child into the nose of the child. This examination gives information about the adenoid, but it is useful to avoid this examination in terms of the child’s psychology.

HOW TO TREAT ANALYSIS?

If the child has an allergy that causes the adenoid to enlarge, this should be treated with nasal cortisone sprays. Again, the use of antibiotics during acute infections is very important. If the adenoid is still large and causes complaints in the child despite drug treatment, the adenoid should be surgically removed.

WHEN SHOULD GENIZE SURGERY BE DONE?

If the child’s sleep quality is impaired depending on the size of the adenoid and he is constantly breathing through the mouth

If sleep apnea has developed in the child depending on the size of the adenoid

In the presence of frequently recurring adenoid infections that do not improve with medication

If there is fluid accumulation in the middle ear that does not improve with drug therapy

In these cases, it is beneficial to have the adenoids surgically removed.

HOW IS DENTAL MEAT SURGERY PERFORMED?

Adenoid surgery is performed under general anesthesia. Adenoid is taken with instruments called adenotome. In addition, adenoids can be reduced with the radiofrequency method. However, it does not provide a significant advantage over the classical technique.

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