thyroid cancer

What is Thyroid Cancer?

The majority of thyroid cancer is a disease with a very good prognosis compared to other cancers. Patients whose treatment and follow-up are planned correctly can live for many years after diagnosis. The purpose of administering high-dose radioactive iodine to patients with thyroid cancer is to remove the remaining thyroid tissue and possible cancer spreads after surgery. This treatment can only be given in centers with specially equipped treatment rooms. The reason for the need for such a room is to prevent the uncontrolled transmission of radioactivity to the environment by the patients receiving treatment. As long as the patients stay in this room, they can continue their normal lives. The amount of radioactivity in the patients’ bodies is measured every day, and when a level that does not prevent them from being discharged is reached, the patients can go home. However, they organize their lives by following the precautions that need to be taken for 10 more days at home. Patients are called for control at regular intervals, and their treatment is planned according to the results of the examinations. All patients whose thyroid glands have been destroyed by surgery and radioactive iodine treatment take thyroid hormone, which is the regulator of vital functions in our body, externally (in pill form) throughout their lives. A multidisciplinary (concerning more than one medical branch) approach is required in order to diagnose, treat and follow-up thyroid diseases (various forms of goiter and thyroid cancer).

Thyroid Cancer

Thyroid cancer is a disease that is not seen very often and a large part of it has a very good course compared to other cancers. The first step after thyroid cancer is detected is surgery. After surgery, treatment is continued with radiation therapy and hormone drugs. In thyroid cancer surgery, the entire thyroid gland is usually removed if the cancer has spread to the lymph node. If it has spread to the lymph nodes, lymph nodes can also be removed. Removal of the entire thyroid gland is usually preferred. This method; It is the most preferred treatment because it reduces the risk of recurrence of the disease, allows radioactive treatment, and facilitates the control of the disease by physicians. Radioactive Iodine Treatment starts to be applied six weeks after the surgical operation. The purpose of administering high-dose radioactive iodine to patients with thyroid cancer is to remove the remaining thyroid tissue and possible cancer spreads after surgery.

This treatment can only be given in centers with specially equipped treatment rooms. The reason for the need for such a room is to prevent the uncontrolled transmission of radioactivity to the environment by the patients receiving treatment. As long as the patients stay in this room, they can continue their normal lives. The amount of radioactivity in the patients’ bodies is measured every day, and when a level that does not prevent them from being discharged is reached, the patients can go home. However, they organize their lives by following the precautions to be taken for one more week at home. Patients are called for control at regular intervals, a follow-up method is planned according to the results of the examinations. All patients whose thyroid glands have been destroyed by surgery and radioactive iodine treatment take thyroid hormone, which is the regulator of vital functions in our body, externally (in pill form) throughout their lives. In order to diagnose, treat and follow up thyroid diseases (various forms of goiter and thyroid cancer), a multidisciplinary approach is required. Therefore, patients are primarily handled by an endocrinologist.

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