Oral Diagnosis and Radiology

  • What is Oral Diagnosis?

Oral Diagnosis;It is the process of making a diagnosis following the examination of the x-rays of the patient’s oral region and a detailed intraoral examination.

  • Radiology

Dental radiographs, that is, dental films, are the most helpful in the diagnosis of intraoral diseases, especially those related to hard tissue such as teeth and jawbones. The two most used types of dental films are; periapical (small, showing 2-3 teeth)and panoramic (large, showing all upper and lower teeth and all jawbones)are movies.

  • Dental Films (Dental Radiography)

Digital Panoramic Radiography: Panoramic radiographs are the imaging technique of all existing teeth in the mouth, impacted teeth, the bone tissue surrounding the teeth, the entire jawbone. While the images of the x-ray taken can be seen on the computer screen instantly, enlargement-reduction operations and measurements can be made on these images at the same time. In this technique, the radiation rate to which the patient is exposed is also significantly reduced. It is also an important advantage that the images can be stored in the patient file on the computer or shared over the internet when necessary.

Periapical Radiographs:It is an in-mesh imaging technique used to obtain more detailed images about suspicious situations detected in panoramic radiographs, and only a few teeth adjacent to each other and the bone tissue surrounding these teeth can be viewed.

Digital Radiographs (RVG): While the images of the X-ray taken can be seen on the computer screen, at the same time, desired color adjustments, enlargement-reduction operations and measurements can be made on these images. In this technique, the radiation rate to which the patient is exposed is also significantly reduced. It is also an important advantage that the images can be stored in the patient file on the computer or shared over the internet when necessary.

Computed Tomography (CT, CT): It is a three-dimensional tomographic imaging technique used in cases where traditional intraoral and extraoral imaging techniques are insufficient, such as large cysts, tumors and cases where multiple implant applications are planned. Contrary to other two-dimensional techniques, in this method, cross-sections can also be taken from the mouth area, and thus, the neighborhood of the teeth or pathological formations with the surrounding tissues can be examined in 3 planes. Especially in cases where a large number of implants will be applied, the bone thickness in the horizontal direction, the positions of the sinus cavities and the path followed by the vessels and nerves can be determined precisely. Another advantage of this method is that it can be used in combination with the rapid prototyping method to prepare working models or guide plates of the desired areas before the surgical procedure. In this way, the risk of surgical procedures is minimized.

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