How to Follow Pregnancy?

Many expectant mothers apply to the obstetrician after their period is delayed, suspecting that they are pregnant. During this period, pregnancy is approximately 3-6 weeks. The most important period of pregnancy is the first three months, that is, the first 12 weeks. In this period, the formation of the basic organ drafts of the fetus is completed.
Ingestion of any substance to be taken in the first three months of pregnancy and which will disrupt organ formation or having a disease may lead to the development of permanent disabilities that may even terminate the pregnancy in the unborn child. Negative effects experienced towards the end of the first 3 months of pregnancy increase the risk of the child being born with disabilities.

Pregnancy usually ends in miscarriage as exposure to these effects in the first weeks of this period will cause disorders incompatible with life in the fetus. As I mentioned above, many expectant mothers consult the obstetrician at the earliest 5-6 days of pregnancy. Considering that the applicant applied during the week, we are missing the opportunity to help these people significantly. For this reason, pre-pregnancy doctor control is of great importance. It is very important for the expectant mother to report her diagnosed diseases to the doctor. Because some diseases can be completely controlled before pregnancy can prevent many problems that may occur later.

One of these diseases is diabetes. Due to the lack of treatment, the risk of birth defects in children of women who become pregnant while having high blood sugar is significantly increased.

Lupus is a rheumatic disease and its severity increases from time to time.
In expectant mothers who become pregnant during the exacerbation of the disease, both the course of the disease and the course of pregnancy are very unfavorable. There may even be a life-threatening situation for both the mother and the fetus. It is therefore recommended that these individuals have had a disease-free period of at least 6 months before becoming pregnant.

It is important for expectant mothers with thyroid disease to control their diseases during pregnancy.
High or low thyroid hormone increases the risk of losing the pregnancy. In addition, the intelligence development of the children of mothers with low thyroid hormone levels during pregnancy is lower than the children of healthy mothers.

Diagnosis and control of asthma is very important for expectant mothers who plan to become pregnant. Pregnancy worsens the course of asthma in approximately one third of patients. In asthma patients, there is a temporary narrowing of the airways of the patients. If this narrowing is severe, the oxygen level in the mother’s blood decreases. Therefore, since the amount of oxygen going to the fetus will decrease, the child may suffer from disabilities, which can lead to brain damage. It should be aimed to start the most appropriate treatment before pregnancy and to minimize the frequency of asthma attacks and even prevent them completely.

Pregnancy can also worsen the course of some heart diseases. For some heart patients, pregnancy is even life-threatening. For this reason, it is very important for expectant mothers who have been diagnosed with heart disease or who have findings in this direction during the examination, and to know whether they can handle the pregnancy or not. If the pregnancy is life-threatening, contraception should be recommended to these patients or pregnancy should be allowed only after the necessary precautions are taken and the expectant mother understands the risks that pregnancy will bring to them.

Likewise, kidney failure adversely affects pregnancy. In addition, pregnancy status can permanently worsen the condition of patients with renal failure. For this reason, expectant mothers with kidney failure should be examined before pregnancy. Pregnancy is not recommended if kidney failure is advanced. But the choice should be left to the expectant mother if she understands and accepts the risks of pregnancy.

Some infectious diseases that can be transmitted in the early stages of pregnancy can cause miscarriages and even congenital disabilities. It is not recommended to get pregnant for mothers who have such diseases. In order to prevent such a risk, pregnant women who have not had some diseases such as rubella, chickenpox, and jaundice or who have not been vaccinated against these diseases can be vaccinated before pregnancy.
You should not get pregnant for 3 months after vaccinations containing chickenpox and rubella.

In addition, in order to avoid the aforementioned infectious diseases during pregnancy, expectant mothers should avoid being exposed to animal and especially cat feces (for example, cleaning the sand that house cats defecate), not eating unpasteurized cheeses (including roquefort and similar cheeses), and avoiding raw vegetables and meats ( such as sushi), it is recommended to wear gloves when dealing with gardening. For the same reason, during this period, expectant mothers should not approach children who have a febrile illness. This is especially important for mothers who work in schools and nurseries. All expectant parents who plan to become pregnant should be tested for HIV, the causative agent of AIDS.

If patients with this virus receive appropriate treatment throughout their pregnancy and birth is carried out under appropriate conditions, the risk of transmission to the unborn child is less than 1%.

It is also important to detect expectant mothers with hepatitis virus, which is one of the factors of jaundice.
Because vaccination of the babies of these mothers after birth will prevent the transmission of the disease.
Pre-pregnancy cigarette, alcohol and other substance addictions should also be brought to the agenda.
Getting rid of such addictions is important for the health of both the child and the mother.

Detection of hereditary diseases that may be in the mother and father is very important in terms of determining the possibility of this disease in the child to be born. In some cases, one of the parents can only be the carrier of the disease.
In this case, the disease is not seen in the parent or the child. However, if both parents are carriers of that disease, there is a risk of the child being born sick. Mediterranean Anemia is common.
Therefore, societies with frequent carriers can be screened to detect the carrier status of some diseases.
Knowing the carrier status of the parents in advance allows to determine the probability of the disease in the child to be born beforehand.
Mother, father-to-be and doctors can decide on pregnancy in the light of this information and take the necessary precautions.
Knowing whether any hereditary disease is seen in other members of the family is also helpful in the detection of hereditary disease carriers.
Therefore, providing detailed information about family members and even providing photographs when necessary can guide the estimation of the risk of hereditary antenatal diseases.

Having both spouses checked by a doctor before getting pregnant can prevent many problems that may be encountered during pregnancy that may affect both the mother and the child to be born.

Women who are of childbearing age and plan to become pregnant in the near future should bring this issue up when they apply to an obstetrician and gynecologist for birth control or any other reason during premarital and regular health checkups.

During such a control, the father-to-be should also be examined.
Inheritance from the father plays an important role in many hereditary diseases. Communities where carriers are common can be screened to detect carrier status of some diseases.
Knowing the carrier status of the parents in advance enables the possibility of the disease to be seen in the unborn child to be determined beforehand.
Mother, father-to-be and doctors can decide on pregnancy in the light of this information and take the necessary precautions.
Knowing whether any hereditary disease is seen in other members of the family is also helpful in the detection of hereditary disease carriers.
Therefore, providing detailed information about family members and even providing photographs when necessary can guide the estimation of the risk of hereditary antenatal diseases.
If the planned pregnancy is not the first, knowing the problems encountered in previous pregnancies will help plan the measures to be taken against these problems in future pregnancies.
For example, if there have been more than 2 miscarriages, genetic testing of the parents may show that the miscarriages are hereditary.

Another cause of recurrent miscarriages is that the mother’s blood is more prone to clotting than normal. Initiation of a treatment to prevent clotting before pregnancy will prevent pregnancy losses that may occur due to this reason.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *