hip replacement surgery

You can stand up and start taking steps a few hours after hip replacement surgery. Using the walker may be a bit of a problem at this stage, as you will probably still have the IV line and probe connected. But don’t worry. A physical therapist will assist you. It will teach you whether to put weight on the new hip joint and how much weight you can load. By trying, you can soon be able to start walking again with just the help of a walker.

Hip replacement surgeries, like all other surgeries, carry some risks.

• Reaction to anesthesia

• Blood coagulation

• Infection

• Dislocation of the joint or loosening of the prosthesis

• Damage to surrounding vessels, bone or nerves

• Thigh pain

HIP PROSTHESIS SURGERY PROCESS

When the surgical team is ready, you will be taken to the operating room. There you will be given anesthesia. Anesthesia will allow you to sleep throughout the surgery or numb your body only from the waist down. After that, the operator’s hip

An incision will be made to reach your joint, then the damaged bone head will be removed and the bone bed will be prepared to allow the prosthesis to fit. After the new joint is placed, the incision is closed with a surgical staple or suture.

BONE PREPARATION

The round bone head is cut off from the femur and the surface of the old bed is smoothed. The new bed is then placed in the pelvis. The bearing is usually press-fit and fixed in place with screws or cement. This type of prosthesis has small holes on the surface: Your bone will fill these holes over time.

ASSEMBLE NEW PIECES

The handle of the new hip joint is inserted into the head of your thigh bone. After this handle is firmly placed on the thighbone, the new ball and bearing are joined. Press-fit method or cement can be used to fix the handle of the prosthesis. Your operator will determine the most convenient method for you.

DEALING WITH PAIN

Although you are given medication, you may feel pain at first. It’s normal. However, if your pain does not decrease at all, be sure to inform your nurse. Pain relievers can be given by injection into the muscle or by joining your blood circulation system directly through a vein.

YOU CAN USE A PATIENT CONTROLLED ANALGESIA DEVICE

With the PCA device, which means Patient Controlled Analgesia, you can control your own pain medication yourself. At the push of a button, pain medication enters your body intravenously. With PCA pumping, it is possible to maintain a stable level of pain control. Thanks to the safety features of these devices, it is not possible to take more medication than necessary.

HOW TO PROTECT YOUR HIP?

During your stay in the hospital, you will also learn to move in a way that will protect your new hip. We call these action measures. The precautions we need to learn from you will be determined by the type of operation performed to repair your hip. You must follow all the rules taught to you.

LEARN TO MOVE WITHOUT DANGER

Until fully healed, the movements that an artificial hip joint can safely do are limited. In other words, it is not possible to bend and rotate like a natural hip. In the beginning, some movements will force the new joint too much. Your therapist will teach you to stay within the safe range of movements allowed by the new joint. Ask and find out how long you need to follow the precautions you will see below.

SITTING PRECAUTIONS

Sit in a high, hard chair so you can keep your hips higher than your knees. Do not use low sofas or chairs. Remember this: Never cross your operated leg over your other leg. Always keep your legs apart, do not cross them.

BEND PRECAUTION

Never bend over so that your waist hangs below waist level. Keep this in mind when standing or sitting.

ROTATION MEASURE

Do not bend your operated leg so that your foot is turned inward or outward depending on the technique of the surgery and according to your doctor’s recommendation. Remember this precaution also when lying down or sitting.

HEALING PERIOD IN THE HOSPITAL: BEING ABLE TO WALK

Once you’ve learned how to protect your hips, you’ll also need to learn the skills needed to return to normal life. You will be taught how to walk, sit, dress and undress. Ask them to give you painkillers before each workout to make it easier for you to move.

WALKING AGAIN

You can stand up and start taking steps a few hours after the surgery. Using the walker may be a bit of a problem at this stage, as you will probably still have the IV line and probe connected. But don’t worry. A physical therapist will assist you. It will teach you whether to put weight on the new hip joint and how much weight you can load. By trying, you can soon be able to start walking again with just the help of a walker.

SITTING AND CLOTHING

For the safety of your new hip, a physical therapist or physical therapist will show you how you can do your daily work more safely. While sitting, dressing or going up and down stairs, you should pay attention to the following points:

• While sitting, get close enough to the chair that the tip of it touches your leg. Then lower your body to the seat by taking strength from the arms of the seat. Keep your operated leg extended forward at all times.

• When putting on socks and shoes, use a long tool with hooks or grippers. Try this with untied and slip-on shoes first.

• Use a long-handled sponge and a long shower hose when washing your feet and legs.

• When climbing stairs, first climb a step with your non-surgical leg. Then move your operated leg to the same step. When descending, press the lower press first with your operated foot.

HEALING PERIOD AT HOME

Whether your recovery is at home or in a rehabilitation center, you have to protect your new hip joint. Follow the sitting and moving rules they taught you in the hospital. Do not forget to visit your operator for your scheduled check-ups and gradually return to daily activities. Total hip replacement is major surgery, so if it takes a few months to feel completely healed, you should take it for granted.

WHEN SHOULD I CALL THE OPERATOR?

You should call your carrier if any of the following symptoms occur:

• Increase in hip pain

• Pain or swelling in the calf or leg

• Unusual redness, burning or oozing at the surgical site

• Difficulty in breathing or pain in the chest

• Fever higher than 38°C

RETURN TO ACTIVE LIVING

Do walking exercises every day. You should increase these exercises every week. Start by going to get yourself a glass of water first. The important thing is that you never interrupt these exercises.

After your surgery site has healed and your hip movements have been partially restored, you are ready to start sexual activity. Ask your operator or nurse what positions are safest for sexual activity.

CARING FOR YOUR NEW HIP JOINT

An infection in your body can damage your new joint. Consult your operator before any medical or dental intervention. We may need to use antibiotics against infection. To check the stability of your joint, you may need to have an X-ray taken about every two years.

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